Does your stomach walk into the room 5 minutes before you do?

Hi Gorgeous,

When I'm co-creating a healing path with my clients, the first thing we take into consideration is sustainability.

When I first started out in private practice in my twenties, diet plans were the holy grail of nutrition counseling. I could design the hell out of an eating plan for my clients. It was all so perfect on paper.

The thing is, reality is a whole different game. Most of the women who come to me are all knotted up and tattered from 30 years of dieting, having a metabolism that’s been gutted, and a state of mind that’s gone countless rounds in the ring with shame, guilt, failure, and unworthiness. (Diets, 1 –you, 0.)

Having a family, working long hours, and juggling life are game-changers. We have to keep things super simple so eating fits into our life--not the other way around.

And so the real task for us all is creating something that feels GOOD and DOABLE for the long-term.

Your goal may only be one big change in your eating (one green juice daily, going gluten-free, adequately hydrating yourself) for a few months. And that’s more than fine. Because if you can’t sustain these changes for the short-term, they won’t work for you in the long-term, either. 

I’m all too familiar with the cycle of initial excitement, followed by feelings of overwhelm, and ultimately failure, and this is not the goal at all of any of this. The goal is to add things before you take away anything else. Try them on for size. See how they feel for you. See if you even enjoy them. See if they feel like self-love to you—the kind of love that you want to keep for the long haul because they feel so good to your body. 

Keep what works for you and toss away the rest. My hope for you is that you feel nothing less than amazing—and that that only keeps you coming back for more. 

Live Gorgeously,
Esther

Esther BlumComment